Badok

http://www.berria.eus/blogariak/berriaberritzen/2014/12/16/badok-aplikazioak-euskal-musika-gehiago-entzutea-ekarriko-du/

“Badok aplikazioak euskal musika gehiago entzutea ekarriko du”

Badok-en aplikazioaren aurkezpena Durangoko Azokan.Badok euskal musika hedatu eta sustatzeko sortua da, eta zeregin hori gero eta eraginkorrago betetzen ari da. Zeregin horren barruan, musika  entzuteko aukera ematea garrantzia berezia du. Maiatzetik atzora arte, Badok-ek 216.150 entzunaldi ahalbidetu ditu. Gaur aurkeztu dugun aplikazioak euskal musika gehiago entzutea ekarriko du, aukera berri bat zabalduko duelako telefonoen bidez musika bilatu, deskubritu eta entzuteko ahalmena erraztuz”.

Badok-en aplikazio berria aurkeztearekin batera, Badok Berriaren Euskal Musikaren atariak berritu denetik hona, hau da, maiatzaren 29tik gaur arte, eman duena datuetan laburbildu dute Berria-ko zuzendari Martxelo Otamendik, IKT arduradun Pello Urzelaik eta Badok-en arduradun Jon Eskisabelek.

Badok eskuko telefonoetarako aplikazioa eskuragai dago Google Play (Android) eta Apple Store (iOS) dendetan, dohainik. “Erabilgarria, osoa eta maila handikoa da Badok aplikazioa”, nabarmendu du Pello Urzelaik. Funtsean, webgunearen eduki berberak eskaintzen ditu. Atal nagusiak (Azkenak, Aldizkaria, Musikariak, Zerrendak, Zuzenean,…) erabiltzeko aukera ematen du, musika entzuteko aukera ematen du, bilatzaile eraginkor bat eskaintzen  du eta kantuak, zerrendak eta diskoak Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, sms eta posta bidez banatzeko aukera ematen du.

(gehiago…)

The 2014 Annual Meeting Mobile App has arrived!

http://blog.aaanet.org/2014/11/25/the-2014-annual-meeting-mobile-app-has-arrived/

Print I’m sure you’ve all be waiting with baited breath for the official release of this year’s annual meeting mobile application.  There are quite a few search-ability enhancements you’ll all appreciate. Be sure to take advantage of the communication and scheduling options as well.

I wanted to take some time specifically to address an issue we had last year, which was availability to recently registered attendees.  While we would like to provide you with instantaneous access to this amazing app, it isn’t always feasible.  I won’t bore you with details, but there will be a lag between the time you’ve registered and the time you have access to the mobile app. With any luck this will be mitigated to an hour or so. If you go a day without having access to the mobile app, then you might want to contact one of the staff (who will probably direct you to me).  You patience during this process is greatly appreciate, as we are a constantly evolving (and hopefully improving) association.

For example, I just ran the attendee list. So if you registered after 11/24/2014, then you will likely not be on the mobile app list until the next update is done, which will be tomorrow.

Without further delay, you can pick your app up on the iTunes Store or the Android Store. We don’t have a Windows App or one for Blackberry, but if there’s enough of a demand, I’ll try and get something together for next year.

“Why I signed” (the petition for academic boycott of Israeli institutions)

http://blog.aaanet.org/2014/12/01/why-i-signed-the-petition-for-academic-boycott-of-israeli-institutions/

Guest blog post by AAA member,  Steven Caton (Harvard U).

I have not been a fan of boycotts in the past, so why did I change my mind?

The Gaza war in June and the continuing settlement finally made me reconsider. All the hand wringing over the Palestinians and pronouncements critical of Israel and its policies were doing absolutely no good. I spoke to a number of colleagues and friends, two of them Israeli, and two of them not (no Palestinians I regret to say) about the pros and cons of the proposed boycott, and after contemplating what they said for several weeks, I finally decided to sign. In other words, I did not take this action lightly. I have thought longer and harder than ever about questions of academic freedom that boycotts raise, and whether it’s impossible to distinguish between boycotting institutions and individual scholars, as it is claimed by boycott opponents.

Let me try to tackle the issue of academic freedom first. Opponents of the boycott argue that the freedoms of individual academics will be jeopardized, Israeli, Palestinian, and even scholars like myself who might “self-censure” by not publishing in journals supported by Israeli academic institutions, and that the boycott will not only be counter-productive but wrong in principle. It’s hard for me to buy this argument, when the range of academic journals, publishers and internet sites are so numerous and various as to make it possible to communicate one’s research outside the boycotted venues. A more reasonable concern is whether by not attending Israeli conferences or not teaching in Israeli classrooms, one is weakening these institutions to the point where they will see a cut-back in support for, say, anthropology, and thus do damage to the discipline inside the country as well as to individual anthropologists working in these institutions who are critical of Israel’s policy towards Palestinians and other marginalized groups within the country. Or conversely, that I am denying the possibility of my own speaking out within Israel against Israel’s policies and the university system that supports them. Let’s face it, even if we were given the chance to make that point or debate it, it would be dismissed as a personal view. I’d rather forego the opportunity to debate the issues within Israel, where these things tend to get coopted or marginalized in any case, and align with my colleagues in condemning what I think is unjust, which I think is a much more powerful tactic.

(gehiago…)

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

December 17, 2014: Mastering the Campus Visit with Karen Kelsky

karen

Dr. Karen Kelsky is the founder and principal of The Professor Is In, a blog and business dedicated to helping Ph.D.s turn their advanced degrees into jobs.  A former R1 tenured professor in Anthropology, and department head in the Humanities, Dr. Karen demystifies the unspoken rules that govern university hiring. In addition to blogging on every aspect of the job market, from building a competitive record and planning a publishing trajectory, to writing job applications, interviewing, and negotiating an offer, Dr. Karen works directly with clients on their individual job searches.  She also has a book in press with Random House, The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. Into a Job.   It comes out August 4, 2015.

In this webinar, I walk you through the basic expectations and potential pitfalls of the dreaded Campus Visit (sometimes called a Fly-Out) in Anthropology.There will be time for Q and A at the end, so bring questions!

We will examine:

 -The basic organization of a campus visit  -The job talk and Q and A
 -The single biggest pitfall for candidates  -The teaching demo
 -The initial arrangements and scheduling  -Handling meals gracefully
 -Preparing for the visit  -What to wear, especially in cold weather
– Meetings throughout the day

This amazing webinar is complimentary so register here, the password is “anthro”. And be sure to put it on your calendar so you don’t miss it.

Pimp my … trash cart?

In Brazil, “catadores” collect junk and recyclables. But while they provide a vital service that benefits all, they are nearly invisible as they roam the streets. Enter graffiti artist Mundano, a TED Fellow. In a spirited talk, he describes his project “Pimp My Carroça,” which has transformed these heroic workers’ carts into things of beauty and infused them with a sense of humor. It’s a movement that is going global.

AAA Statement on Police Practices

http://blog.aaanet.org/2014/12/19/aaa-statement-on-police-practices/

AAA President Monica Heller releases public statement on police practices in the United States and calls upon anthropologists to help create equitable policing:

In the United States, too many black Americans are killed by officers of the law. As anthropologists, we must speak out whenever our common humanity gives way to discrimination, prejudice and violence. We must speak out whenever anyone acts in ways that accords the full rights of personhood to some but not all. In this case, these injustices are perpetrated by those who are trained to protect us all, requiring a radical re-examination of the processes and structures that produce these tragedies on a regular basis.

Anthropologists can, and do, contribute to this re-examination by showing how structural inequality makes racism and race-based violence commonplace, whether it is motivated by individuals’ conscious intent or not, and in particular how officers of the law come to perpetrate such violence. It is time now to join with others to undo that process. Because it stops today.